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HASTINGS’ FREE FLOWER SEEDS

We believe thoroughly in flowers and will help you get them. With every order from this Catalog before May 1, 1922, to the amount of $1 or over, not including field V seeds or plants, we will send absolutely free one packet each of these illustrated flowers, all beautiful and easily grown: California Decorative Sunflowers, Sujjerb Mixed Dianthus, Centaurea Bachelor’s Button, Sweet Alyssum, and Golden West Eschscholtzia or California Poppy. Remember, these are free.

lapB^ H. C. HASTINGS CO. - Atlanta, Ca.

TEAR OFF THIS ORDER SHEET ALONG THIS LINE

Please do not write in above space

HASTINGS’ SEEDS ORDER SHEET

(S-1922) I PLEASE

H. G. Hastings Co., Atlanta, Ga.

Gentlemen:—! am enclosing for the following

seeds to be sent by

DO NOT WRITE IN THIS SPACE

(State here if wanted by Mall, Express or Freight)

Name. P. 0.

(If Mrs., kindly use husband’s initials or given name, as Mrs. Sam B. Clark)

R. F. D. No.

.Box No.

-State.

Express or Freight Office ^

(If different from your Post Office)

BEFORE ORDERING PLEASE READ DIRECTIONS FOR ORDERING IN THIS CATALOGUE ON PAGES 4-5

NUMBER IN CATALOG

Quantity

Names of Seeds or Other Articles Wanted

PRICE

Dollars Cents

1 YEAR’S SUBSCRIPTION TO THE SOUTHERN RURAilST 25 CENTS

, East of Mississippi River, 25 cents; West of Mississippi, 50 cents

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Pm

cc

H

1

M

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0

ft

in

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Pm

Remember— No order too large or too small to send to HASTINGS'

NUMBER

QUANTITY

ARTICLES WANTED

DOLLARS

CENTS

bi

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(A

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X

H

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u

$

O

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PLEASE

Seed Premiums

Please read carefully so that you understand this offer fully. When you or- der seeds in packets and ounces to the amount of one dollar or over you can select other seeds in packets only to the amount of 25 cents on each dollar’s worth of packets and ounces ordered. This does not apply to the larger sized packages, such as quarter-pounds, pounds, two-pounds, etc., nor does it apply on special collections of seeds, onion sets, plants or bulbs. You can not order, a dollar’s worth of seeds in packets and ounces and then select a quarter-pound of something priced at 25c, or a pound of peas or beans as a premium ; neither can you order a dollar’s worth of seeds in quarter-pounds, pounds or two-pounds, and then select 25 cents’ worth of seeds in packets. To be entitled to these premium seeds you must order seeds in packets and ounces to the amount of a dollar or more, and then select the premium seeds in packets only. We shall be glad to have you select the premium seeds that your order may entitle you to under this offer.

When Ordering Write Below

The names of several of your neighbors or friends who have not received our catalog but who you believe might order from us. For your kindness we shall be glad to send you some extra seeds along with your order.

NAMES

POSTOFFICE

R. F. D. No.

STATE

H. G. Hastings Co., Seedsmen, Atlanta, Georgii

1

HALF YOUR LIVING WITHOUT MONEY COST

The question of cost of living is and has been a question that has come home to every one of us in recent years. A year ago, or a lit- tle more, the high prices of everything was the trouble. Now the trouble is lack of money to buy with even at much lower prices for the things we usually buy.

Our greatest trouble here in the South is that we buy too much food, grain, etc., at high prices that can be and should be grown on our own ground and at practically no money cost.

We are between fires most of the time. If we have a good crop of cotton or other so-called cash crop the price is too low to make it really pay a profit. On the other hand when prices are high our yields of cotton or other cash crop is so small that there is not money enough to match our buying needs when we depend on sup- ply merchant for most of our food.

The general spread of the boll weevil over practically all the cot- ton growing territory brings this question right home to three- fourths of the readers of this catalog. Dependence on cotton to pay for all or practically all food consumed is no longer safe. To stick to the old way of cotton or other cash crop growing with the idea of paying for food and grain from the cash crop is simply inviting the sheriff to come and sell you out sooner or later.

On the next page we go into this question at greater length. It will pay you well to read all that we say on this subject very care- fully. For more than thirty years we have been carefuliy studying this question and experimenting in our own farming operations.

Growing cotton or other cash crop and buying all or nearly all food and grain with what the cash crop sells for can’t be done and at the same time have you and your family live in decent style either in the way of food or clothing or the other things necessary to make life worth while. He who attempts this is attempting the impossible and every people and every country that has tried to do it has failed.

It’s time to quit butting our heads against this stone wall. It’s time for every one of us who has not already done so to break the chains of one crop slavery. It’s time to give the food and grain crops, sufficient for home needs at least, first attention instead of last attention, the best ground instead of the sorriest ground, the best of cultivation instead of the “lick and a promise” kind.

We must produce our cash crops at less cost or go broke. This is cold facts that we face. The cost of making “cash crops” is large- ly the cost of food for the human labor and food for the animal

labor. Home grown food, grain and forage can be largely made without money cost and largely in time that would otherwise be wasted or idled away.

These food and grain costs are at the very least half the cost of making any and every cash crop in the South. If you grow your foods and feeds you don’t have to buy them or go in debt to merchants for them. With food and grain a-plenty the need for credit is lim- ited. You simply can’t get ahead until food, grain and forage is made at home. You can get at least half of all your living without money cost or going in debt. If you can’t go all the wav the first year go part way. Every little helps and if you go at this honestly and earnestly you will soon be out of debt.

Naturally your thoughts turn first to corn, potatoes, cowpeas, the different hay and forage crops, etc., one or more pigs and the cow. That’s right, absolutely right. The pigs mean meat; milk is one of the best of foods, especially for the children and you cannot well have too much of it. Corn means meal for the family, grain for the working live stock. The same is true of other iteiiis. You know your needs as to amount of these grain, forage and other crops far better than we do and can act accordingly.

If given a fair chance the home vegetable garden is the greatest, quickest and cheapest source of healthful food for the family and the surplus is available for canning or drying for winter use. In fact there are few places in the South where the garden cannot be made an all-the-year-round source of food supply.

The right kind of a garden with suitable variety according to family likes, well prepared and well planted, kept worked and re- planted as fast as the earlier sorts mature and are used up, will go a long ways towards being half the living besides saving doctor’s and druggist bills. The garden should be the hardest worked piece of ground around the place and kept working for you every day in the year.

Take your home garden seriously. Make a real, sure-enough gar- den, not one of these straggling excuses containing a few cabbages, a row of beans and fifty or sixty corn stalks that are so common. Two or three dollars’ worth of vital garden seeds, such as Hastings’ supplies, will produce a wonderful money saving, health saving supply of vegetables that will make a big hole in your store bill for food.

It will soon be garden time. Get seeds now and have them on hand ready for the first favorable season for planting.

Alphabetical Index

Showing Page for Catalogue Reference

Flower seeds are listed on pages 54-68.

Summer Flowering Bulbs are listed on pages '78, 79, 80 and rear cover.

Plants for the “Home Beautiful” are listed on pages 67-77.

Insecticides and Fungicides, page 100.

So far as possible, in making up this cata- log, we arranged the vegetables, flowers, bulbs, and plants in alphabetical order.

Alfalfa Page 87

Artichokes 5, 96

Asparagus 5

Bacteria, Soil Inoculation 101

Beans, Garden 33. 5-9

Beans, Mung 92-93

Beans, Soy or Soja 91

Beans, Velvet 95

Beets 33,10-11

Beggarweed 99

Bene 99

Broccoli 17

Brussels Sprouts 17

Buckwheat 98

Bug Death 100

Bulbs 78-80

Cabbage, Seed and Plants 12-16

Cane, Orange, Amber, Syrup 97

Cantaloupe 19-21

Carrots 18,33

Cauliflower 16

Celeriac 18

Celery 18

Chard, Swiss (Sea Kale) 11

Chufas (Earth Almonds)

Citron, Green Giant

Clovers

Collards

Collections, General

Corn, Broom, Milo Maize

Corn, Kaffir

Corn, Chicken

Corn, Field

Corn, Pop, Roasting Ear, Sw’eet

Cos Lettuce, White Paris

Cotton

Cress

Cucumbers

Eggplant

Endive

Ferns

Feterita

Fetticus (Corn Salad)

Flowers, Seeds, Plants, Bulbs..

Flowers, Live Plants

Fungicides

Gherkins

Gourds

Grasses

Herbs all kinds

Honey Dew Melon

Horseradish Roots

Insecticides

Kale (Borecole)

Kohl Rabi

Leeks

Lespedeza (Japan Clover)

Lettuce

91

31

87

17

3

99

98

98

....84-86

25

27

82-83

17

....22-24

24

17

68, 69, 71

98

17

....54-80

....67-77

100

22

24

, . . .88, 89

46

21

42

100

17

24

32

87

.26-27, 33

Mangels, Stock and Sugar Beets 11

Millet (Golden and Pearl) 99

Mustard 32

Okra 32

Onion, Seed and Sets 34-37

Parsley 46

Parsnips 40

Peanuts 96

Peas, Garden or English 33,38-39

Peas, Field or Cow 94

Peppers 34,40-41

Pe Tsai (Chinese Cabbage) 16

Plants, Summer Flowering 67-77

Potatoes, Irish 42

Pumpkins 43

Radish 34,44-45

Rape 90

Rice, Upland 99

Rhubarb (Pie Plant) 42

Roses Inside Back Cover, 76-77

Rutabaga 53

Salsify 46

Seeder, or Hand Sower 100

Sorghum (Cane) 97

Southern Ruralist 81

Spinach 47

Squash 51

Sunflower 63,99

Teosinte 99

Tobacco 94

Tomato 34, 48-50

Turnips 52-53

Vines (See Plants) 69-77

Watermelons Front Cover, 28-31

This complete Catalog all Beading Matter and Illustrations Coi>yrighted, 1931, by H. G. Hastings Co., Atlanta, Ga.

2

H. G. Hastings Co., Seedsmen, Atlanta, Georgia

HOME GROWN FOOD

PAYS NO OUTSIDER A PROFIT

We are repeating here what has been said in a previous catalog. We consider that home production of food, grain and forage on every farm amply suilicient for the needs of the family and live stock is absolutely necessary to Southern farm prosperity and a style of living that we are all entitled to if we will each do our part.

Let us be honest and quit trying to fool ourselves any longer. Can you, Mr. Cotton Grower, after dividing your crop with the boll weevil, which you will have to do every year, afford to pay any out- sider a profit on the food, grain and forage used by your family and work stock while making cotton? You couldn’t afford to do it with cotton at 50 cents.

Can any of you out of present or prospective prices of cotton, tobacco, fruit or vegetables grown for shipment afford to pay an outsider a profit on what is consumed on your farm ? Certainly not when practically all of those things can be grown on your own acres at one-third to one-half the cost at merchant’s prices.

We have all had some awful bumps since the summer of 1920, bigger, harder bumps than any of us could have anticipated. Some of these bumps could have been softened some had our government acted differently then, but that’s all water over the dam. It does no good to discuss that part of it now.

The real-right-down-to-the-bottom-trouble is that we are paying unnecessarily too many profits and expenses to outsiders on the food and grain consumed on our Southern farms. We know that there are some exceptions to this, some good folks were far sighted enough to see the common sense necessity of home production but they are few in comparison with the many.

We all go broke or near broke every time there is a slump in the price or yield of our so-called cash crops. It matters not whether the cash crop be cotton, tobacco, vegetables or berries for ship- ment, oranges, peaches or what not. The system of one crop growth and the buying of all or nearly all of the food and grain is a sys- tem deadly' to permanent farm prosperity.

Our dream of easy money is over. We Avoke up to a reality of debt, disaster, thousands of farm bankruptcies, in many cases the savings of a life time, SAA’ept away. In greater or less degree this kind of a thing has happened three times in the last dozen years. We pay a fearful price every few years for the privilege of follow- ing this Avrong system.

Do you knoAV any farmer in your community who has been for several years groAving his oaaui bread, meat, vegetables, grain and forage who Avas put out of business by the times Ave have passed through during the past tAA^elve or fifteen months? We don’t.

It’s true that all of us are more or less hard up, money scarce and store or bank credit as scarce or scarcer than money. But, the man Avho has been making his bread and meat, who has enough on hand to do him until the next “bread and meat” comes in, has need for little credit and can get that credit if there is any credit around the neighborhood.

We might just as AA^ell face facts. Most of us have bravely and courageously gone to Avork to repair the damage and losses of the past tAvo years. There was nothing else to do. We ought, however, neA’er let ourselA'es get caught in the same kind of a trap again. If we do we are not entitled to help or sympathy.

We might just as well forget all about 35 or 40 cent cotton and like prices for the tobacco, the fruits, the market vegetables, etc. Those prices are probably gone, never to return within our life- time. We must face the necessity of making and selling cotton at less than 20 cents, probably around 15 cents Avith normal size crops. Other crops must be sold in proportion.

Cost of production must be brought doAvn. The cost of making cotton or other cash crop is largely the cost of bread and meat for human labor, grain and forage for animal labor. You can not af- ford to pay an outsider a profit on the food and grain, the larger part of the cash crop money. Make food, make grain, make forage on your own acres and pay no unnecessary outside profits.

HOGS KEEP SHERIFF AWAY

Talking about live stock in a seed book may look out of place but it is not. Neither the South nor any farmer in the South is going to regularly prosper until a good measure of hogs, cattle and poultry is coupled up with general farm crops.

Go anywhere in this broad country you will; go into any foreign country and you cannot find permanently prosperous farmers or permanently prosperous agricultural sections or districts except where cattle, hogs and poultry, fed on home grown crops are a part of regular farm practice.

We might just as well get it through our heads right now that we cannot prosper without growing hogs, cattle and poultry on our farms, not only for eating on the farm ourselves but as a “cash crop”. No farmer ever AV'ent “broke” who had plenty of live stock and plenty of home grown feed for that live stock.

Time and again within the last three months good farmers here in Georgia who grow a lot of hogs but have still been playing the cotton growing game considerably have told us that their hogs were the only thing that kept the sheriff aAA-ay this last fall.

We especially stress hogs as the start in live stock on our farms because they are of quick growth, that is if pure bloods or good grades are used. Properly fed pure bred stock of breeds adapted to the South easily reach from 150 to 200 pounds in six or seA^en months and at the same time use up much for feed that would otherwise be wasted.

There has been an outcry recently for- some cash crop to take the place of cotton. Hogs, cattle, both dairy and beef breeds, and poul- try are cash crops far better than cotton for the Southern farmer who will give them a square deal and feed them on home groAvn feed.

There is an almost unlimited market in the South for meat, poul- try and dairy products and even Avere our Southern markets fully supplied we could with our faA’orable conditions of soil, climate and crops make meat, dairy products and poultry cheaper than any other section of the United States,

Is there a market? First your home needs are to be fully sup- plied with meat, milk, chickens and eggs. Second, there are the city and town folks to feed. The manager of one of Georgia’s big meat packing plants said recently that a million pounds of fresh meat was coming into Georgia from outside every day. Yet most of our packing plants are shut down most of the year for lack of Southern grown hogs and cattle to slaughter.

Despite the fact that cities such as Atlanta are buying all the but- ter they can get from southern creameries it is literally true that hundreds of carloads of Illinois and Wisconsin creamery butter

comes into Atlanta every year and is paid for with cotton money. Yet Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi creamery butter is equal to if not superior to the Northern product. Our sister state of Ten- nessee rightfully boasts of the millions of dollars she draws from Georgia and other Southern States each year for chickens, eggs and turkeys.

Friends, Ave have simply got to quit committing financial suicide every year by trading off our cotton or other cash crop for some- thing to eat and in most of the South for commercial fertilizer with which to grow the cotton. We have done this for sixty years and it gets us noAvhere except in the hole. You know this to be true. You suffer, your family suffers, your land suffers.

The South is and always will be a farming country. It is your business and ours to make it a rich farming country instead of the relatiAmly poor one that it noAV is. If the Almighty eA'er made a natural live stock country it is the South. The only thing wrong is the lack of inclination of our people toAvards live stock.

Most of our lands are “run doAvn” from continuous clean culture of cotton. We groan under fertilizer costs that can only be light- ened by plenty of manure produced on our farms by live stock feeding on home groAvn grain, forage and grazing crops.

If you and your neighbors will grow hogs, cattle and poultry you need not be afraid of “no market”. If some merchant in your toAvn AAmn’t give you a square deal in marketing the hogs, cattle, etc., you can easily, Avith the aid of your county agent, organize a co-opera- tive selling organization and the marketing problem is settled.

Live stock on every farm will prove the salvation of the South, make it rich and every grower of Ih’e stock in it rich. You will then get the profits that the outsider has been getting, the profits that have made the outsider rich and you comparatively poor.

HoweAmr, don’t jump into live stock growing head over heels. If you have a start, increase your hogs, cows and poultry gradually but steadily. Your home needs of meat, milk, butter, chickens and eggs should be provided for first. After that comes sale of surplus for cash.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that hogs, cows and chickens can live on air, water, pine bark or scrub oaks. That kind of feed- ing will get you nowhere. Live stock means more corn, cowpeas and soy beans, mung beans, sorghum, chicken corn, velvet beans, Sudan grass, peanuts, chufas, oats, rye, barley and pastures.

These are the crops that will walk to market on foot and make the boll weevil of no consequence. Get live stock and then plant feed crops for that live stock, This means success.

3

//. G. Hastings Co., Seedsmen, Atlanta, Georgia

Hastings’ Bargain Collections

Of Vegetable and Flower Seeds

There seeing to be an increasing number of seed buyers each year, who nrefer to buy collections of seeds, both vegetable and flower.

There is a reason for this increasing popularity of our collections and that reason is that they give the purchaser greater value for their money than can be obtained from any other house in this country.

Every variety in every one of these collections is a time-tried standard sort that has proven itself. There are no untried novelties on the one hand, nor are there any obsolete, out-of-date, ought-to-be-discarded varieties on the other. In each collection there are only such varieties as any one would be entirely satisfled to have in the garden. Every packet in every collection is a full-sized packet, exactly the same sized packet and same quality of seed as if you bought each packet separately.

You may wonder why we offer seeds in these collections at lower or “bargain” prices. The first reason is that it encourages the use of a greater number of kinds of vegetables in gardens everywhere, gets our friends in the habit of having a greater variety of vege- tables in their gardens and on their tables. The other and a most important reason is tliat time during the active seed selling season from January to April is the scarcest thing there is about the Hastings’ establishment. During the dull months of November and December the seed in these collections are put up in the packets and the collections assembled. When the order comes during the rush season all that’s necessary is to wrap the particular collection up for mailing, paste on an address label, stamp it and put in postoffice. It takes no more time to fill an order for a $1.00 or $2,00 collection than to fill an order for a packet of seed for 10 cents.

These collections are not offered as premiums and no premiums are allowed on collection orders. Collection prices are strictly net.

Our Seed and Plant Collections

Hastings’ Introduc- tory Flower Seed Collection (No. I)

10 Packets, 40 Cents, Postpaid

1 Pkt. Sweet Alyssum $0.05

1 Pkt. Cosmos, Finest Mixed . . .05

1 Pkt, Kochia or Burning Bush . .10

1 Pkt. Dianthus, Superb Mixed , .10

1 Pkt. Four O’Clooks, Mixed . . .05

1 Pkt. Nasturtiums, Tall Mixed. .05 1 Pkt. Pansy, French Mixed . . .10 1 Pkt. Petunias, Single Mixed . .05

1 Pkt. Poppies, Superb Mixed . . .10

1 Pkt. Mixed Sweet Peas 05

$0.70

For 40 cents we will send one full size packet each of the above 10 vari- eties, postpaid.

Hastings’ Southern Flower Seed

50 Cents

HASTINGS’ HALF DOLLAR VEGETABLE COLLECTION (No. 4)

14 Packets

1 Pkt. Improved Blood Turnip Beet . . . .$0.10

1 Pkt. Wardwell’s Kidney Wax Beans ... .10

1 Pkt. St. Valery Carrot 05

1 Pkt. Early Fortune Cucumber 05

1 Pkt. Rockyford Cantaloupe 05

1 Pkt. Chinese Mustard 05

1 Pkt. True Southern Collard 05

1 Pkt. Kleckley Sweet Watermelon .

1 Pkt. White Velvet Okra

1 Pkt. Bermuda White Onion ....

T Pkt, Rosy Gem Radish

1 Pkt. Royal King Pepper

1 Pkt. Early White Bush Squash . . 1 Pkt. Redfield Beauty Tomato . . .

.$0.10 , .05 . .10 , .05 . .10 . .10 . 10

$1.05

For 50 cents we will send the above 14 full sized packets of seed by mail, postpaid. No changes will be allowed in this collection. No others will be sold at these prices.

$1 Hastings’ Dollar Collection (No. 5)

% lb. Wardwells Kidney Wax Beans . . .$0.20

y2 lb. McCaslan Pole Beans 25

1 oz. Crimson King Beet 15

1 Pkt. Surehead Cabbage 10

1 Pkt. Eden Gem Cantaloupe 10

1 Pkt. St. Valery Carrot 05

1 Pkt. Hastings’ AVhite Spine Cucumber . . .10

1 Pkt. Kleckley Sweet Watermelon 10

1 Pkt. White A’’elvet Okra $0.05

1 Pkt. AVhite Bermuda Onion 10

1 Pkt. Alaska Extra Early Pea 10

1 Pkt. Royal King Pepper 10

1 Pkt. Early White Bush Squash 05

1 Pkt. Matchless Tomato 10

1 oz. Early Flat Dutch Turnip 10

$1.65

This is the big home garden year. Grow your own food and save the high food prices. For $1.00 we will send the Hastings’ Dollar Collection (15 varieties) postpaid. No changes will be allowed in this collection. No others will be sold at this reduced price.

Collection (No. 2)

20 Packets, 75c Postpaid

1 Pkt. Alyssum, Sweet .$0.05

1 Pkt. Centaurea (Sweet Sultan) .10

1 Pkt, Antirrhinum, Mixed 10

1 Pkt. Asters, Unrivalled Mixed . .10

1 Pkt. Balsam, Rose-Flowered . .10

1 Pkt, Candytuft, Empress ... .10

1 Pkt. Canna, Mixed 10

1 Pkt, Celosia, Cockscomb . . . ,10 1 Pkt. Japanese Morning Glory . .10 1 Pkt. Kochia or Burning Bush . .10

1 Pkt. Dianthus, Superb Mixed . .10 IPkt. Zinnias. Tall Double Mix’d .10 1 Pkt. Mignonette, Fragrant . . .05 1 Pkt. Tall Mixed Nasturtium . .05 1 Pkt. Pansy, French Mixed ... .10

1 Pkt. Petunias, Finest Mixed . . .05

1 Pkt. Phlox, Grandiflora Mixed. .10 1 Pkt, Poppies, Superb Mixed . . .10

1 Pkt. Mixed Sweet Peas 05

1 Pkt. Verbena, Finest Mixed . . .10

$1.75

For 75c, we will send, postpaid, the above 20 full size packets of Flower * Seed. No changes will be allowed in this collection. No others will be sold at these prices.

Collection (No. 6)

loz. Kleckley Sweet Watermelon $0.15

IPkt. Chinese Mustard 05

1 oz. White A^elvet Okra 10

1 Pkt. Prizetaker Onion 10

1 Pkt. Royal King Pepper 10

Yo lb. Bliss Everbearing Garden Peas ... .20

l oz. Rosy Gem Radish 10

1 oz. Early AA'^hite Bush Squash 15

1 Pkt. Redfield Beauty Tomato 10

1 oz. Purple Top Strap Leaf Turnip 10

$2.70

For $2.00 we will send the above splendid “Home Garden Collection” postpaid to any postoffice. No changes will be allowed in this collection. No others will be sold at these prices.

Plant Flowers Around Your Home

Roses, Sunny South Collection

yellow, three pink. Twelve separate and distinct varieties, well rooted, healthy plants, postpaid, for $1.50. See page 76 and all varieties in natural colors on inside back cover.

Geraniums, Our Eclipse Collection lolb™ of “he

choicest French and American varieties. Specially selected for Southern conditions. Twelve sep- arate and distinct varieties, healthy, well rooted 'plants, $1.50; postpaid. See page 74.

Superb Chrysanthemum Collection Hon of the best shades and colors,

selected from the best garden growing varieties. These will please you. Twelve strong, healthy plants, postpaid, for $1.50. See page 75.

$2 Home Garden

1 oz. Improved Blood Turnip Beet . . . .$0.15

1 lb. Wardwells Kidney Wax Beans 40

y, lb. McCaslan Pole Beans 25

14 lb. Jackson Wonder Bush Lima Beans . .20

1 Pkt. St. Valery Carrot 05

1 Pkt. Surehead Cabbage 10

1 Pkt. Hastings’ White Spine Cucumber . . .10

1 Pkt. Big Boston Lettuce 10

1 Pkt. Eden Gem Cantaloupe 10

1 Pkt. AA'atson AVatermelon 10

4

H. G. Hastings Co., Seedsmen, Atlanta, Georgia

UNITED STATES PARCEL POST ZONE RATES

Parcel Post Zones

Weight

in

pounds

1st and 2d Up to 150 miles

3d

1.50 to 300 miles

4th

300 to GOO miles

5th

600 to 1,000 miles

6th

1,000 to 1,400 miles

7th

1,400 to 1,800 miles

8th

Over 1,800 miles

1

.$0.05

.$0.06

$0.07

.$0.08

1 $0.09

$0.11

$0.12

21

.08

.11

.14

1 .11

.21

.24

A

1 .07

.10

.15

.20]

.25

.31

.36

4

.08

.12

.19

.261 .33

.41

.48

5

.09

.14

.23

.32 1 .41

.51

.60

6

.10

.16

.27

.38 1 .49

.61

.72

7

1 .11

.18

.31

.44

1 .57

.71

.84

8 1 .12

.20

.35

.501 .65

.81

.96

9 1 .13

.22

.39

.56

( .73

.91

1.08

10 1 .14

.24

.43

.62 1 .81

1.01

1.20

11 1 .15

.26

.47

.68 1 .89

1.11

1.32

12 1 .16

.28

.51

.74

1 .97

1.21

1.44

13 1 .17

.30

.55

.80

i 1.05

1.31

1.56

14

.18

.32

.59

.861 1.13

1.41

1.68

15

.19

.34

.63

.92

! 1.21

1.51

1.80

16

.20

.36

.67

.98

1.29

1.61

1.92

17

.21

.38

.71

1.04

. 1.37

1 1.71

2.04

18 1 .22

.40

.75

1.101 1.45

1 1.81

2.16

19 1 .23

.42

.79

1.16i 1.53

1 1.91

2.28

20 1 .24

.44

.83

1.22 i 1.61

[ 2.01

2.40

21

1 .25

.46

.87

1.28

1 1.69

1 2.11

2.52

22 1 .26

.48

.91

1.34

1.77

2.21

2.64

23 1 .27

.50

.95

1.40

1.85

2.31

2.76

24

1 .28

.52

.99

1.46

i 1.93 1

1 2.41

2.88

25

1 .29

.54

1.03

1.52

1 2.01

1 2.51

3.00

26

1 .30

.56

1 1.07

. 1.58

1 2.09 1

1 2.61

1 3.12

21

1 .31 1

.58

1.11

1.64

, 2.17

1 2.71

1 3.24

QC

1 .32 1

i .60

1.15

1.70

2.25 1

1 2;8i

1 3.36

29 1 .33 1

.62

1.19

1.76

2.33

2.91

1 3.48

30

1 .34 1

.64

1.23

1.82

1 2.41

3.01

1 3.60

31

1 .35 1

1 .66

1.27

1.881 2.49

1 3.11

1 3.72

32

.36

.68

1.31

1.941 2.57

1 3.21

1 3.84

33

.37

.70

1.35

2.00

1 2.65

1 3.31

3.96

34

.38

.72

1.39

2.06

1 2.73

3.41

4.08

35

.39

.74

1.43

2.12

1 2.81

3.51

4.20

36

.40

.76

1.47

2.181 2.89

3.61

4.32

37

.41

.78

1.51

2.24

2.97

3.71

4.44

38

.42

.80

1.55

2.30 1 3.05

3 81

4.56

39

.43

.82

1.59

2.36

3.13

3.91

1 4.68

40

.44

.84

1.63

2.421 3.21

1 4.01

4.80

41 1

t .45

.86

1.67

2.481 3.29

4.11

4.92

42 1

1 .46

.88

1.71

2.54

3.37

4.21

5.04

43

.47

.90

1.75

2.60

3.45

4.31

5.16

44

.48

.92

1.79

2.66

3.53

4.41

5.28

45

.49

.94

1.83

2.72

3.61

4.51

5.40

50

.54

1.04

2.03

3.02

4.01

5.01

6.00

55

.59

1.14

....1

60

.64

1.24

.... 1 ....1 .... 1

65

.69

1.34

.... 1 ....1 .... 1

70 1

.74

1.44

.... 1 ....I .... 1

APPROXIMATE LOCATION OF ZONES

For those who cannot easily get information as to their zone we give the following approximate location of the zones. If at all in doubt as to your zor be sure and send enough to cover necessary postage. If you send too mu^ it will be returned to you. The rates in the 1st and 2nd zones are the same.

GEORGIA Eargely in the 1st and 2nd zones. Extreme southern part is in 3rd zone.

AEABAMA Divided among three zones ; eastern half in 2nd zone, western half in 3rd zone except extreme southwestern portion which is in the 4th zone.

FEORIDA Has three zones. The northern part is in the 3rd zone, the middle and most of South Florida in the 4th, and ex- treme southern portion in 5th zone.

MISSISSIPPI About evenly divided, the eastern half being in the 3rd and the w^estern half in the 4th zone.

EOUISIANA AND ARKANSAS— Both of these states are entirely in the 4th zone.

TEXAS Mostly in the 5th zone, a small part including the most eastern counties being in the 4th and extreme western portion in 6th.

For those who only order seeds for garden use in packets, ounces, quarter pounds, pounds, or peas, beans, corn, etc., in one or two-pound lots, no attention need be paid to this page for calculation of postage.

On all items of seed listed in this catalogue in packets, ounces, quarter pounds, pounds, and in the case of peas, beans, and corn in one and two-pound lots the price given on them in- cludes postage prepaid by us to any postoffice regardless of the zone the purchaser may live in.

Prices on small lots of seeds are made post- paid largely for the reason that it would be almost impossible to calculate correctly the weight of a general order for seeds containing numerous items and different quantities of each, so we have thought best to include a reason- able average cost of postage in the quoted prices of these smaller quantities, thus reliev- ing the buyer of the trouble of figuring on the matter of correct postage for his particular order.

When one goes into the purchase of larger quantities when the actual weight can be easily and correctly figured and on which the post- age rates are proportionately lower than on the smaller shipments it becomes a matter of com- petition with express and freight and in the case that the purchaser lives some distance from town on an R. F. D. route, the parcel post shipment will be brought to his door instead of the purchaser having to go to town and get it from the express or freight office. Further in many instances the parcel post rates are as low or lower on comparatively small shipments than express or freight and the service more prompt.

WHEN YOU ORDER

When you order seeds in quantity at prices listed by express or otherwise,